TidalCycles Extension 0.5.6 for VS Code

The TidalCycles extension for VS Code has a fresh update. A couple of improvements have been made around configuration setting errors and custom boot file path errors.

Config Setting Errors

The new update now removes errors telling you that the TidalCycles config settings were “unknown”. Now it’s just a clean config:

Neat!

Boot File Path Errors

A few minor versions ago, we introduced the ability to configure a path to a custom Tidal boot file. With that, you can now configure Tidal to load up all of your custom stuff in a seamless bootup sequence. However, if VS Code could not locate your custom bootup file it wouldn’t tell you.

Now, the Tidal console output and a VS Code message will notify you that you boot file was not found:

What’s more is that you can fix your boot file config settings and try to reboot Tidal without restarting VS Code. Fancy!

Oh Hey One More Thing!

VS Code recently released a new feature where you can dock the terminal to the right-hand side of the IDE:

So now you can put the Tidal output to the side instead of below your Tidal code, if you so desire:

Atom package v0.12.1: current directory boot file

The latest version (0.12.1) of the TidalCycles package for Atom has a new option to use a bootup file in your current project directory:

What this means is that you can now have a custom bootup file for each “project” you may be working on (e.g. compositions, MIDI modules, custom OSC setups, live sets, etc).

All you need to do for this to work is to create a BootTidal.hs file at the root of your Atom project folder:

If you’re not sure where to start with a custom boot file, you can reference a sample default one on the TidalCycles Atom package page, or use this code:

With these configuration options, you can now have complete control over your own custom Tidal boot code rather than modifying the source code of the package’s boot file.

For more information check out this video that explores all of the boot options in the Atom Tidalcycles package:

Elastic Tempo Flux

I just published a new tutorial video on how to achieve continuous, elastic tempo changes in TidalCycles.

The video covers techniques with two different functions: nudge and spaceOut.

nudge

You can use nudge to move the timing of events into the future. Here, we schedule each of the four cp samples with future times of 0, 0.7, 0.2, and 0.4 seconds, respectively:

The above example isn’t very interesting. However, when you apply a sine function to nudge, you can make time appear to stretch in a smooth way:

Different pattern densities, scaling, and sine speeds interact with each other to create different results:

spaceOut

The spaceOut function lets you specify a list of cycle speed multipliers, and then plays the pattern exactly once at each speed:

The above code will play the cp*4 cp*2 pattern at 1, then 0.5, 1.33, 0.1, and 2 times the normal cycle speed.

Where spaceOut gets a little more interesting is when you use Haskell’s list syntax to build longer lists of linear (or non-linear) values. Consider this spaceOut pattern that plays at speeds ranging from 1 to 3, incrementing by 0.1:

The above pattern has 30 different speeds (!) but with very little code.

You can achieve speed “oscillations” that resemble a triangle wave by adding two lists together with the ++ operator:

You can use many different Haskell features to build lists. Here is a different method that constructs lists of fractional values using map:

Atom Package v0.11.0: custom Tidal boot path

A new release (version 0.11.0) of the TidalCycles package for Atom is available today. With this version you can now specify a path to your own boot file in the package settings:

This means that you no longer need to modify the provided BootTidal.hs file in the package with your own custom logic (e.g. custom functions, additional modules, etc).

If you want to create your own boot file:

  1. Create a copy of the original (available here)
  2. Save it anywhere on your computer
  3. Modify the TidalCycles package settings to point to where you saved the new file